Disappearing Languages


In this new era, many of the old civilizations languages are disappearing due to dominant ones. In many parts of the globe, languages are becoming extinct and that’s why YouTube is archiving them so that they can be viewed around the world.

Why Do Languages Die Out?

Throughout human history, the languages of powerful groups have spread while the languages of smaller cultures have become extinct. This occurs through official language policies or through the allure that the high prestige of speaking an imperial language can bring. These trends explain, for instance, why more language diversity exists in Bolivia than on the entire European continent, which has a long history of large states and imperial powers.

As big languages spread, children whose parents speak a small language often grow up learning the dominant language. Depending on attitudes toward the ancestral language, those children or their children may never learn the smaller language, or they may forget it as it falls out of use. This has occurred throughout human history, but the rate of language disappearance has accelerated dramatically in recent years.

YouTube brings endangered languages to you

Did you know that there are quite a few languages in the world today that are close to dying out?  In fact, these small languages are so endangered that they haven’t even been recorded or documented scientifically.  That’s all about to change with the help of YouTube.

For the very first time, these small languages will have a presence online with millions of people having direct access to them.

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One Comment Add yours

  1. Kevin says:

    This is an interesting post which would fascinate English students. Language extinction is a no more a myth.It is translating iself into reality. I fear about our language “Creole” which is a dialect not spoken through out the globe except a few islands and states.
    We must promote languages to avoid its extinction, for example, as it is happening in Mauritius – the integration of Creole dialect as a language in the school curicullum.

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